College 

MAINTAIN YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health conditions are common among  young  adults, according to The National Alliance for Mental Illness (www.nami.org). Fifty percent of all lifetime mental illnesses develop by age 14 and 75 percent develop by age 24.

Speaking up and asking for help is a sign of strength. It can be hard to know what to say, but start with something like, “I’m not feeling right. I think I need help. Can I talk to you about it?”

Mental health services and supports are available and the earlier you access them, the better. NAMI recommends taking these actions on your own to strengthen your health:

  • Maintain and build support systems. Connections with friends and family at home provide much needed stability and you should keep in touch. But college also provides opportunities to make new friends and create new support systems through clubs and classes. If you’re homesick, allow yourself to call home, but also reach out to the people around you. They may be missing home, too, and will welcome a new friend.
  • Maintain and build support systems. Connections with friends and family at home provide much needed stability and you should keep in touch. But college also provides opportunities to make new friends and create new support systems through clubs and classes. If you’re homesick, allow yourself to call home, but also reach out to the people around you. They may be missing home, too, and will welcome a new friend.
  • Maintain and build support systems. Connections with friends and family at home provide much needed stability and you should keep in touch. But college also provides opportunities to make new friends and create new support systems through clubs and classes. If you’re homesick, allow yourself to call home, but also reach out to the people around you. They may be missing home, too, and will welcome a new friend.
  • Maintain and build support systems. Connections with friends and family at home provide much needed stability and you should keep in touch. But college also provides opportunities to make new friends and create new support systems through clubs and classes. If you’re homesick, allow yourself to call home, but also reach out to the people around you. They may be missing home, too, and will welcome a new friend.
  • Maintain and build support systems. Connections with friends and family at home provide much needed stability and you should keep in touch. But college also provides opportunities to make new friends and create new support systems through clubs and classes. If you’re homesick, allow yourself to call home, but also reach out to the people around you. They may be missing home, too, and will welcome a new friend.
  • Maintain and build support systems. Connections with friends and family at home provide much needed stability and you should keep in touch. But college also provides opportunities to make new friends and create new support systems through clubs and classes. If you’re homesick, allow yourself to call home, but also reach out to the people around you. They may be missing home, too, and will welcome a new friend.

ASKING FOR A FRIEND

Worried about a friend? NAMI suggests ways to help build a positive, social support network:

  • Check-in regularly. Call or text your friend once or twice a week. Let them know that you are there.
  • Include your friend in your plans. Even if your friend doesn’t always come, they will probably appreciate being included.
  • Learn more about mental health conditions. Find out more about what your friend is going through so you are better able to help.
  • Avoid using judgmental or dismissive language, such as “you’ll get over it,” “toughen up,” “snap out of it.” Reassure them that everything will be okay and that you are there for them.

If your friend is experiencing a mental health condition, this is a time when he or she needs you the most. Just talking about it might help your friend feel less alone.

Visit NAMI.org for more helpful information.

NEED HELP?

  • Colleges and universities have resources, so if you have a need, ask. Your college or university and the local community want to provide the support you need to succeed.
  • Addiction Recovery is never easy. Start with your campus health center if you are struggling or seek a community support group. Ball State University offers services to help students recover from various types of addiction.
  • Clothing isn’t always in the budget. IUPUI’s Paws Closet serves students of IUPUI. Students may shop twice per month and are welcome to take 4 clothing items and 2 accessory items free of charge. Paw’s Closet also takes appointments for special services such as interview preparation.
  • Counseling services are available on most college campuses. For example, Hanover College provides free and confidential counseling services and will work in tandem with a provider from the student’s hometown if desired.
  • Disability services are your legal right. Don’t hesitate to connect with the disability services offices on your campus.
  • Food insecurity is a fact for many students. IU offers the Crimson Cupboard food pantry, offering free food to IU Bloomington students who cannot otherwise afford it. Stocked by donations and staffed by volunteers, this special food pantry lessens the effects of poverty and food insecurity in the community. Crimson Cupboard operates on the honor system and will never ask you for financial information. Many other schools offer something similar. Acorns Campus Pantry at Manchester University, Bear Necessities Food Pantry at Ivy Tech, Sycamore Pantry at Indiana State University, ACE Campus Food Pantry at Purdue University and Grenadier Grab n’ Go at IU Southeast, which also offers personal care items, are just some examples.

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