Featured Grad Guru Blug 

Think You Can Solve Einstein’s Riddle?

Looking for something to occupy your brain over the Thanksgiving break? If so, you might give this a try. My high school geometry teacher gave us Logic Puzzles like Einstein’s riddle all the time. It was a great break from the Pathagorean Theorem, hypotenuses, parallel postulates and other triangular formulas. Some people call the riddle impossible—it is not. Although it will take some work and patience. Good Luck and let us know if you solve it!

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Featured Grad Guru Blug 

Students—Feeling Burned Out?

Burnout. It can happen to any of us. Burnout is defined as a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion. It occurs when you feel overwhelmed, emotionally drained, and unable to meet constant demands. How can students avoid the stress-related state of exhaustion? In an article on Curiosity.com, researcher, Ryan Korstange, offers 5 tips to help students from burning out.

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Featured Grad Guru Blug 

Entrepreneurs look no further

Indiana is home to two of the best schools for entrepreneurs We would like to congratulate Ball State and Purdue Universities for being named as 2 of the Top 50 Undergraduate schools for entrepreneurship. The schools were chosen by The Princeton Review in partnership with Entrepreneur magazine. The survey examines more than 300 colleges and universities in the U.S. and abroad. Way to go Cards and Boilers!    

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Featured Grad Guru Blug 

FAFSA – What is it?

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is a form the federal government, states, colleges and other organizations use to award financial aid for college or grad school. The FASFA application asks questions about a student’s personal and familial financial circumstances in order to determine how much they can pay for college. This is not a short form. Be prepared to spend almost an hour to complete the form completely. The form is detailed, and mistakes can be costly. Avoid frustration by being prepared. Make sure to verify your FAFSA…

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Grad Guru Blug 

Butler to launch esports center, gaming curriculum

Butler University is probably Exhibit No. 1 for illustrating how a small to mid-sized college can use sports to dramatically boost its profile. We’re of course talking about its men’s hoops program, but the school also is about to open an esports center on campus as a way to attract students interested in competitive gaming. The first phase will debut next month, but the Esports and Gaming Lounge will reach its full 7,500 square feet in fall 2020, making room for 50 gaming computers, an area for console play, co-working…

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Career Grad Guru Blug 

3 Strategies for a Happier Job Hunt

You’re graduating from college soon, and you need a job. Not just any job, but one that will jumpstart your brilliant career. Where to start? Successful college graduates know the importance of these three strategies: Strategy: Use Campus Resources Every college campus has a career services office to help students (and even alumni) get a jumpstart on their careers. Counselors can help you choose a career (or even a major, if you are still shopping around) with self-assessment tools to help you examine your values, personality, interests and abilities. You’ll…

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Career 

Connect to Internships

Internships are a great way to try out jobs and develop your skills. Indiana INTERNnet can connect you with thousands of Indiana organizations across the state, making it easy to search and apply for internships all on one site. Amy Schrader, human resources and marketing coordinator for Backhaul Direct/Grapevine TMS, an Indiana-based logistics company, graduated from IUPUI in 2018, and landed an internship with her employer the same year through Indiana INTERNnet. “I do not think that I would have been able to get the exact job I wanted so…

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Career Featured Grad Guru Blug 

Indiana: 11 Reasons Why

Things are happening in Indiana that may have a big impact on your future. Here’s why you should pay attention: 1. Indiana companies are serious about hiring young talent. It’s estimated that Indiana is poised to create 1 million jobs in the next decade, and that’s where the non-profit Ascend Indiana comes in. Twenty-four (and counting) employer partners like One America, Cook Group, Eil Lilly and Co., Franciscan Health and Deloitte are tapping into the Ascend Network and its cloud-based platform that combines algorithms with human interaction to match early-in-career…

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Career 

The Surprising Truth About What Employers Really Want

As senior director for talent acquisition for the global healthcare company Roche Diagnostics in Indianapolis, Terra Doyle meets countless college job seekers each year, and also compares notes with her industry colleagues. What do recruiters like to see in applicants? The usual rules apply, of course. Be professional in your presentation—even your email can speak volumes—and put your best foot forward, Doyle said. Tech skills may be in demand, and if you’re in finance, you better have a handle on accounting. But surprisingly, there are other key qualities employers want…

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Career 

Career in Rotation

Aishariya Bandyopadhyay racked up a lot of varied work experience during college, but that didn’t end when she entered her first full-time, post-graduation job at Roche Diagnostics in Indianapolis. A native of Munster, Bandyopadhyay was studying marketing at Indiana University when she had her first internship experience for a wedding planner in Chicago. The next summer, she left the glamour behind for an internship for ArcelorMittal, a steel and mining company. Her final college internship at consumer packaged goods company, Kimberly Clark, was closer to Bandyopadhyay’s career goals of consumer…

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College Grad Guru Blug 

Stress or Something More?

College can be stressful. But how do you know what is “just stress” or something more serious? That’s one of the most common questions asked of Ball State Professor of Psychology Jerrell Cassady. He and a colleague developed the “Cognitive Test Anxiety Scale” to help people find out if they have “high test anxiety” or “just regular anxiety.” “The results of work with that and related scales has demonstrated that most people fall into the “moderate” level of test anxiety at some point during what we refer to as the…

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College 

Should I Take Online College Classes?

Never getting out of your pajamas and taking classes online may sound like a good option. But is it a good way to earn a college degree? “Online learning can play a part in every person’s educational journey, but it is not the right, first choice for every student,” according to Ivy Tech Community College Vice Provost Kara Monroe. Too often, students end up in an online course because the traditional classroom course is full, or because they need the credit to enter a degree program. A better approach is…

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College 

New Internships Offer Opportunity for Students with Disabilities

As a student at Ball State University, Dustin Gilmer majored in journalism and telecommunications, with a goal of becoming a sports reporter. But Gilmer struggled to find an internship, which was both a graduation requirement and something he knew he needed to continue to develop marketable job skills. Born with a rare brittle bone condition that has caused approximately 300 broken bones, Gilmer had already overcome so much through ability and personality, but the lack of professional work was holding him back. A former mentor to Gilmer at Ball State,…

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College Featured Grad Guru Blug 

What’s on Your College Bucket List?

College is flying by fast. Think about all you’ve accomplished: adjusting to new living arrangements, making new friends and achieving new academic goals. What else is on your bucket list? Check out these possibilities: Study abroad. Cuba. India. The United Arab Emirates. Indiana University senior Madeline Hudson will have experienced all three very different countries and cultures before she graduates with a degree in law and public policy. “I think that because I have studied abroad in places that are rather difficult to get to, it hasn’t been like a…

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College 

Opportunities abound for Indiana’s college grads

There’s no better time than now for college graduates to be entering the workforce in Indiana. Indiana boasted a 3.3% unemployment rate in August, the lowest the rate has been since April 2018, according to the state’s most recent employment statistics. But the job prospects are even brighter for college graduates. July statistics from the Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD) show that the unemployment rate was just 2.5% for those earning at least a bachelor’s degree. That’s nearly a percentage point lower than the state’s overall rate. And for…

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Cost 

3 Tips for Keeping College Costs Under Control

Three ways to keep college costs to a minimum and secure your financial future: 1. 30 to Finish. Taking 30 credits per year is the best way to graduate on time and within budget. The Indiana Commission for Higher Education estimates that every additional year students spend in college costs at least $50,000 in tuition, fees, and lost wages. Plus, under Indiana law, students must complete 30 credit hours each of their four years of college—an average of five classes per semester—to keep their maximum amount of state financial aid.…

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Cost 

ROTC Paved the Way to Law School

Since she was a student at Cathedral High School, Haley Roach dreamed of becoming a lawyer. She reached that goal in 2019 after graduating from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis. But she’s not headed for a big law firm. Instead, she’s headed for the U.S. Army, where she will join the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps, or JAG Corps, an elite group of military lawyers popularized in movies and television. “Everything was paid for by the Army, including the cost of textbooks and…

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Cost 

Sticking with 21st Century Scholars Program Impacts a Life—and a Family

James Yates signed up for the 21st Century Scholars program as a seventh grader in South Bend, never realizing what an impact it would have on his future. His mother Angela, a single parent, worked several jobs to support him and his three siblings. And while he knew that she wouldn’t financially be able to contribute to his college education, he was “raised to believe that there is no wealth like knowledge and no poverty like ignorance,” he said. Yates was among the first in his family to attend college…

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